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Barack Obama’s “Dreams from My Father” is published

Barack Obama’s “Dreams from My Father” is published


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On July 18, 1995, Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance, a memoir by a little-known law professor named Barack Obama, is published. Obama wrote the book before entering politics; 13 years after it was published, he was elected America’s 44th president.

Dreams from My Father tells the story of Obama’s family—he was born in Hawaii in 1961 to a white mother from Kansas and a black father from Kenya. The book is also, as Obama writes in the introduction, “a boy’s search for his father, and through that a search for a workable meaning for his life as a black American.” Obama describes his adolescence in Hawaii, where he was raised by his white grandparents; his post-college years as a community organizer in Chicago; and a visit he made to Kenya as a young man to meet his African relatives following the 1982 death of his father, who he had seen only once after his parent’s divorce when he was 2.

After being elected the first black president of the influential Harvard Law Review in 1990 while in his second year of law school, Obama was contacted by a literary agent who eventually got him a reported $40,000 advance to write what became Dreams from My Father. When the book was published in 1995, Obama was a law professor at the University of Chicago and had not yet stepped into the national spotlight. The book received favorable reviews; however, it sold a modest 8,000 to 9,000 hardcover copies and went out of print within several years.

The year after the book’s publication, Obama was elected to the Illinois State Senate, his first foray into politics. In March 2004, he shot to national prominence by winning the U.S. Senate Democratic primary in Illinois. The publicity generated by his victory prompted a publisher to reissue Dreams from My Father in the summer of 2004. Boosted by his well-received keynote address at the Democratic National Convention that July, and his landslide election to the U.S. Senate in November of the same year, Dreams from My Father became a best-seller. Reviewers praised the book for its eloquence and candor.

In October 2006, Obama, then a U.S. senator, published his second book, The Audacity of Hope: Thoughts on Reclaiming America. Like his first book, The Audacity of Hope became a best-seller, and Obama drew crowds at book signings as speculation mounted over whether he would seek the presidency. In February 2007, Obama announced he would run for the White House. When asked about Dreams from My Father while on the campaign trail in 2008, he told The New York Times “he was not even thinking about political consequences when he wrote the memoir. In fact, he said, one editor warned him back then that his references to drug use could come back to haunt him—if he were ever nominated for the Supreme Court.”


Much like its author, Barack Obama’s first memoir defies easy categorization. In some stores, it’s shelved with autobiographies, while others place it in African-American history. Of course, now it’s simply American history. First published in 1995, it is one of the few presidential memoirs written before the subject was burdened with the self-consciousness of a man aiming for the nation’s highest office, or the completion of a presidency, when every word is subject to the tint of political hindsight.

But even if Obama hadn’t ended up in the White House, Dreams from My Father would still be a compelling and beautifully written American story about the son of a black man and a white woman, his search for his African father and how he found a “workable meaning for his life as a black American.” It’s a portrait of a man who breaks the mold yet reveres the rules. We see the boldness of someone who could walk away from a career as a well-paid financial analyst in New York City for a low-paid and often frustrating community-organizer job in Chicago. But we also get a sense of Obama’s other, more passive side, the guy who got a contract to write a book about race while still at Harvard Law School and who then chose to become an academic rather than an activist — a professor of constitutional law, rather than, say, a civil rights lawyer. In the end, whether you read this book through the prism of politics or as a coming-of-age tale, it’s important and illuminating.


Book Reviews

Chapter one is very powerful, the thought of a African man married to a white woman in the United States in the 50s wow. The descriptions of the ugly things that were said were painful for me. When they got to Hawaii, I breathed a sign of relief. I grew up in Hawaii and then, as now, we had every color of people one can imagine, though in those days far fewer white people than today. Then his mother meets another man at university and marries Lolo and they are off to Indonesia. I enjoyed chapter two where Lolo teaches him to box. There is a discussion about a man being killed because he was weak, that must have left a very strong impression on Mr.Obama better to be strong! The author moves from topic to topic very quickly, one minute he is being forced to do extra schooling, the next he is getting stitches from an injury playing. In chapter three we are back in Hawaii and in school at the age of ten at Punahou I went to public school, Punahou was for children of privilege. By the time I reached chapter five I was considering putting down the book, I realize we have to talk about our background to help people know who we are, but it was getting tiresome. There was a powerful line in chapter five, it was the only reason I read chapter six:

My identity might begin with the fact of my face, bit it didn't, couldn't, end there.

Chapter six was confusing, at one point he writes that his father had died and then he talks about seeing him in jail. Fortunately, we reach part two of the book hopefully, it will be stronger. The heading says Chicago, but we are still in New York and the discussion seems to be organizing people for civil rights. At the end of the chapter we go to Chicago. Another line I think that is important in understanding the author pops up in chapter eight he is getting his hair cut:

The CHA story is great though, like so much of the book, a bit sad. He stays on one story for pages instead of a few paragraphs, you can sense the excitement and investment. I am glad I did not put the book down after chapter six. The final section of the book is back in Africa. Mr. Obama paints the picture very well, he doesn't overly dramatize the problems, but he has keen observational skills and you can see foreshadowing of today's present troubles. The book ends better than it begins, that is for sure. Mr. Obama was very generous to let so many strangers into his headspace. I suppose the $64,000 question is whether a reader is more or less likely to vote for him after reading the book. Speaking only for myself, I do not know, but I certainly feel that I know "Barry" ( you have to read the book to understand ) better. Tucked in the very back of the book is an excerpt from another one of his books, The Audacity of Hope , I will close with an exceprt:


2. Autobiography, Memoir, Family History, or Something Else

8 The title of Obama’s autobiography, Dreams from My Father,announces an intergenerational perspective that involves both a passing on of dreams from father to son and the son’s search for his father’s past. This double perspective is emphasized further by the subtitle, A Story of Race and Inheritance, which connects Obama’s search for his Kenyan father, who left the family when his son was two years old, whom Obama only saw once for a few weeks when he was ten, and who died when Obama was twenty-one, with the search for a viable narrative of his life, for a way to make sense of his transatlantic heritage.10 Integral elements of this search are core themes of African American letters: the quest for self-discovery vis-à-vis social constructions of race the search for ancestors, the meanings of home, and the power of dreams in the struggle for racial equality. In the words of Cornel West: “What is my relation to my African heritage …? How do I understand my African American tradition and sense of homelessness in America?” (x).11

9 In his introduction to the 1995 edition, Obama establishes a connection between his unusual life story and the complex generic status of his narrative as “autobiography, memoir, family history, or something else” (xvii). Categories and labels, it seems, are always applied by others and rarely describe an inside experience: “Whatever the label that attaches to this book—… what I’ve tried to do is write an honest account of a particular province of my life” (xvii). His story, Obama writes, differs from what he considers the typical autobiography or memoir the book is “a record of a personal, interior journey—a boy’s search for his father, and through that search a workable meaning for his life as a black American.” He continues:

An autobiography promises feats worthy of record, conversations with famous people, a central role in important events. There is none of that here. At the very least, an autobiography implies a summing up, a certain closure, that hardly suits someone of my years, still busy charting his way through the world. I can’t even hold up my experience as being somehow representative of the black American experience. (xvi)

10 This passage foregrounds an awareness of personal writing as an act of self-creation. “He, too, will have to invent himself” (428), Obama writes about his father as a young boy dreaming of living in America, but he might just as well be talking about himself. The modern black intellectual, as Ross Posnock suggests, is a public figure in American life rarely found but more often made (cf. 1-2) “blackness” is something to be achieved, and not simply inherited, as Algernon Austin has illustrated.12

11 The project of making his life meaningful moves Obama towards a pernicious problem: the problem of race, which Du Bois announced would be the problem of the twentieth century (cf. Souls 100) and which has shaped African American literature from its inception. Obama’s life story may not be “representative of the black American experience,” but it must come to terms with this historical experience—and especially the literature that has voiced the many and often contradictory facets of this experience—if the narrator is to make sense of his own experience. This applies to Dreams from My Father as well as to Obama’s later presentations of his life story, for instance in his speech at the Democratic National Convention in 2004. Here, he sought to establish a connection between his family history and American slavery by crediting his grandfather, whom he described as “a cook, a domestic servant to the British,” with having “larger dreams” for his son, Obama’s father (“Keynote” 98). In the context of the debates over Obama’s “blackness”—whether he was “black enough” or “too black” for a presidential candidate—the reference to his grandfather’s life as a servant is important because it allows him to claim a family history of servitude even though he has no slave ancestors. Stanley Crouch, for instance, writing in the New York Daily News (“What Obama Isn’t: Black like Me”),harped on the fact that Obama “does not share a heritage with the majority of black Americans, who are descendants of plantation slaves.”13 Yet it is the birth of “black” literary selves and the willingness to speak autobiographically that has driven African American literature since the early days of the slave narratives, and it is Obama’s self-conscious investment with African American literature that allows him to propose a more nuanced understanding of racial belonging than Crouch and others have advocated.14


Dreams from My Father : A Story of Race and Inheritance

Nine years before the Senate campaign that made him one of the most influential and compelling voices in American politics, Barack Obama published this lyrical, unsentimental, and powerfully affecting memoir, which became a #1 New York Times bestseller when it was reissued in 2004. Dreams from My Father tells the story of Obama’s struggle to understand the forces that shaped him as the son of a black African father and white American mother—a struggle that takes him from the American heartland to the ancestral home of his great-aunt in the tiny African village of Alego.

Obama opens his story in New York, where he hears that his father—a figure he knows more as a myth than as a man—has died in a car accident. The news triggers a chain of memories as Barack retraces his family’s unusual history: the migration of his mother’s family from small-town Kansas to the Hawaiian islands the love that develops between his mother and a promising young Kenyan student, a love nurtured by youthful innocence and the integrationist spirit of the early sixties his father’s departure from Hawaii when Barack was two, as the realities of race and power reassert themselves and Barack’s own awakening to the fears and doubts that exist not just between the larger black and white worlds but within himself.

Propelled by a desire to understand both the forces that shaped him and his father’s legacy, Barack moves to Chicago to work as a community organizer. There, against the backdrop of tumultuous political and racial conflict, he works to turn back the mounting despair of the inner city. His story becomes one with those of the people he works with as he learns about the value of community, the necessity of healing old wounds, and the possibility of faith in the midst of adversity.

Barack’s journey comes full circle in Kenya, where he finally meets the African side of his family and confronts the bitter truth of his father’s life. Traveling through a country racked by brutal poverty and tribal conflict, but whose people are sustained by a spirit of endurance and hope, Barack discovers that he is inescapably bound to brothers and sisters living an ocean away—and that by embracing their common struggles he can finally reconcile his divided inheritance.

A searching meditation on the meaning of identity in America, Dreams from My Father might be the most revealing portrait we have of a major American leader—a man who is playing, and will play, an increasingly prominent role in healing a fractious and fragmented nation.

Pictured in lefthand photograph on cover: Habiba Akumu Hussein and Barack Obama, Sr. (President Obama's paternal grandmother and his father as a young boy). Pictured in righthand photograph on cover: Stanley Dunham and Ann Dunham (President Obama's maternal grandfather and his mother as a young girl).


Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance

As Super Tuesday approaches and we try to separate empty promises and strategic moves from real, actual thoughts and goals, I couldn’t have read a better book than Dreams From My Father.

Here’s why: even though I didn’t realize it when I picked it up, Obama wrote this book over ten years ago, when he was fresh out of law school and long before he was worrying about what people wanted to hear. It is, I think, a great way to “get to know” the candidate outside of the media, the hype, and the confus As Super Tuesday approaches and we try to separate empty promises and strategic moves from real, actual thoughts and goals, I couldn’t have read a better book than Dreams From My Father.

Here’s why: even though I didn’t realize it when I picked it up, Obama wrote this book over ten years ago, when he was fresh out of law school and long before he was worrying about what people wanted to hear. It is, I think, a great way to “get to know” the candidate outside of the media, the hype, and the confusion that comes along with a presidential bid.

The book follows Barack through his childhood in Hawaii and Indonesia, his community work in Chicago, and his journey to meet his father’s family in Kenya. Along the way, he has to come to terms with the death of his absent father, being raised primarily by his white grandparents (you don’t hear about this much), and learning the ropes of being a community organizer in inner city Chicago.

The thing that amazed me most about the book was watching Obama 1) work through problems and 2) analyze both sides on an issue. These two traits came through in two different ways in the book: in personal situations (how he comes to understand and accept his troubled father and his Kenyan ancestry) and in political situations (how he comes to understand the long-standing and deep problems facing the urban poor).

It would have been very, very easy to have bad guys in this book. Evil high-up government officials who prevent community centers and jobs from reaching the impoverished in Chicago. His adulterous and alcoholic father who seemed to abandon his loved ones at every turn. But Barack thinks his way through these simple binary good/bad categories and goes far beyond them. He is constantly striving to 1) understand situations from all points of view and 2) think his way through to a solution. He has an uncanny ability to step away from the emotions of a problem and then systematically chip away at it. He understands very well that you have to know why things are as they are before you develop a plan about how to fix it.

The best example of this might be his work in Chicago. Although it’s unheard of for anyone to criticize the black ministers who organize the urban black communities in Chicago, Obama quickly began to understand the huge problems that come with church-based activism in black communities. Churches would rarely work together to solve larger problems and ministers would rarely do more than preach (which, to be fair, is their job). The action that should have followed a sermon simply wasn’t organized. Because many black leaders were ministers, many black leaders were also, essentially, just talk. What followed was three years of work in which Obama not only made major, innovative steps in Chicago but in which he also learned how to inspire both individuals and small groups into action.

I was also impressed by what Barack Obama didn’t leave out of the book. He made a lot of mistakes, he deals with a lot of anger, and he doesn’t succeed at everything. Still, you can not only see him learning from his mistakes, but immediately applying those lessons to his next challenge.

The book, as a more general read, was good as well. The writing wasn’t stellar (something Obama is quick to point out in the forward to the reprint) but it was still much better than one might expect from someone who isn’t primarily a writer. Getting to see the inner struggle of a biracial person growing up in 60s and 70s America was also really fascinating.

There are a lot of great candidates in the upcoming election, and I feel positive about more than two of them. But especially after reading this book, my doubts about Obama’s lack of experience are gone. He has something that trumps years in Washington: a stellar judgment and an almost eerie ability to put himself in someone else’s shoes and understand both sides of an issue. More than that, his ability to inspire individuals to action is something that America could truly benefit from. You can even see it in his campaign: ordinary people stepping up and acting, even if they’ve never been involved in politics before.

I know that after reading his book, I donated to a political campaign for the first time in my life. He’s nothing less than inspiring.
. more

Audiobook. read by Barack Obama
An oldie but goodie:
It was wonderful listening to Obama. He’s so cordial. and.
. ordinary and extraordinary!

I especially loved when Obama talked about his mother. I laughed when ‘mom’ forced Obama to eat his breakfast each day before school — with Obama rolling his eyes as if it was torture ( I could relate - I did everything I could to get out of eating breakfast as a kid). but where my mother just gave up and went back to bed — Obama’s mother Audiobook. read by Barack Obama
An oldie but goodie:
It was wonderful listening to Obama. He’s so cordial. and.
. ordinary and extraordinary!

I especially loved when Obama talked about his mother. I laughed when ‘mom’ forced Obama to eat his breakfast each day before school — with Obama rolling his eyes as if it was torture ( I could relate - I did everything I could to get out of eating breakfast as a kid). but where my mother just gave up and went back to bed — Obama’s mother gave him the evil eye and made him eat and said. ”listen buster, it’s no picnic for me either”.

At the very beginning of this audiobook- which has been updated since the book was first written. Obama says if he were to have written this book today he ‘may’have written the entire thing about his mother. There is not a day that goes by that he does not miss her.
Obama’s mother is a woman I would have liked to have met. She was an exceptional woman - and it’s no accident that she raised a brilliant son. She took her job as parenting as serious as any parent had.
. she was always teaching. about integrity- morals - honesty - fairness - straight talk - independent thought - safety- healthy habits - and the value of a great education.
It was common for Obama’s mother to stop whatever they were doing and say things like this:
“If you’re going to grow into a decent human being you’re going to need some values”. She believed thoughtful people could shape their own destiny— she was not a religious person —but had good common sense.

It was through Obama’s mother where he learned about his absent fathers values.
No matter how poor his father was, (his mother tells Obama), he was a man of integrity. Obama was raised to inherit the best characteristics of his father.

Hallelujah. Obama said he had no choice but to be a decent moral man - it was in his genes.

Ohhhhh how I miss Obama being our President!

With Barack Obama running for president, I thought it would be a good idea to take a look at who this candidate was. I had been warned by another friend (not a Obama supporter, I should note) that it was poorly written and its message unclear. This perplexed me a bit since that had been contrary to what it seemed like everyone had been saying.

Well, I, on the other hand, found it a completely absorbing read. It&aposs well-written and an interesting story. I wish everyone could read it there are so m With Barack Obama running for president, I thought it would be a good idea to take a look at who this candidate was. I had been warned by another friend (not a Obama supporter, I should note) that it was poorly written and its message unclear. This perplexed me a bit since that had been contrary to what it seemed like everyone had been saying.

Well, I, on the other hand, found it a completely absorbing read. It's well-written and an interesting story. I wish everyone could read it there are so many misunderstandings about Barack's life. While I'm sure there are parts that have been changed, dramatized, shifted around, the theme behind the events that Barack chronicles is evident. It's the story of a boy trying to comprehend who he is, to reconcile with the fact that he looks undeniably different than his mother and grandparents, to cope with the mysterious, absent figure that is his father.

The book provides a better understanding of not only Barack Obama's life, but a greater understanding of who Barack Obama is and why he is the way he is. This book, of course, only presents one side of who Barack Obama is - and the side that Obama presents himself. So, as with all autobiographies, I took it with a grain of salt. But after reading it, I had a much greater respect for him. he worked for years as a community organizer, and it wasn't until I read his book that I realized how hard that work was.

Barack Obama has led a life no one else could really understand, but everyone can relate to in some capacity. I know one of the arguments against him as president is that he doesn't have a lot of experience in office, but after reading this book, one might argue that he has plenty of experience in far more important areas that would serve him better if he were elected. . more

Dreams From My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance, Barack Obama

Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance (1995) is a memoir by Barack Obama, who was elected as U.S. President in 2008. The memoir explores the events of Obama&aposs early years in Honolulu and Chicago up until his entry into law school in 1988. Obama published the memoir in July 1995, when he was starting his political campaign for Illinois Senate. He had been elected as the first African-American president of the Har Dreams From My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance, Barack Obama

Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance (1995) is a memoir by Barack Obama, who was elected as U.S. President in 2008. The memoir explores the events of Obama's early years in Honolulu and Chicago up until his entry into law school in 1988. Obama published the memoir in July 1995, when he was starting his political campaign for Illinois Senate. He had been elected as the first African-American president of the Harvard Law Review in 1990.

Obama recounts his life up to his enrollment in Harvard Law School. He was born in 1961 in Honolulu, Hawaii, to Barack Obama Sr. of Kenya, and Ann Dunham of Wichita, Kansas, who had met as students at the University of Hawaii. Obama's parents separated in 1963 and divorced in 1964, when he was two years old. Obama's father went to Harvard to pursue his PhD in economics. After that, he returned to Kenya to fulfill the promise to his nation.

Obama formed an image of his absent father from stories told by his mother and her parents. He saw his father one more time, in 1971, when Obama Sr. came to Hawaii for a month's visit. The elder Obama, who had remarried, died in a car accident in Kenya in 1982.

After her divorce, Ann Dunham married Lolo Soetoro, a Javanese surveyor from Indonesia who was a graduate student in Hawaii. The family moved to Jakarta. When Obama was ten, he returned to Hawaii under the care of his maternal grandparents (and later his mother) for the better educational opportunities available there. He was enrolled in the fifth grade at Punahou School, a private college-preparatory school, where he was one of six black students. Obama attended Punahou School from the 5th grade until his graduation from the 12th grade, in 1979. Obama writes: "For my grandparents, my admission into Punahou Academy heralded the start of something grand, an elevation in the family status that they took great pains to let everyone know." There, he met Ray (Keith Kakugawa), who was two years older and also multi-racial. He introduced Obama to the African-American community.

Upon finishing high school, Obama moved to Los Angeles for studies at Occidental College. He describes having lived a "party" lifestyle of drug and alcohol use. After two years at Occidental, he transferred to Columbia College at Columbia University, in New York City, where he majored in Political Science.

Upon graduation, Obama worked for a year in business. He moved to Chicago, where he worked for a non-profit as a community organizer in the Altgeld Gardens housing project on the city's mostly black South Side. Obama recounts the difficulty of the experience, as his program faced resistance from entrenched community leaders and apathy on the part of the established bureaucracy. During this period, Obama first visited Chicago's Trinity United Church of Christ, which became the center of his spiritual life. Before attending Harvard Law School, Obama decided to visit relatives in Kenya. He recounts part of this experience in the final, emotional third of the book. Obama used his memoir to reflect on his personal experiences with race and race relations in the United States.

عنوانهای ترجمه شده به فارسی: رویاهای پدرم؛ رویاهایی از پدرم؛ در رویای پدر؛ رویاهایی از زمان پدرم: داستانی از نژاد و میراث؛ نویسنده: باراک اوباما؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز بیست و یکم ماه دسامبر سال 2011 میلادی

عنوان: رویاهای پدرم؛ نویسنده: باراک اوباما؛ مترجم: ریتو بحری؛ تهران، در دانش بهمن، چاپ اول و دوم و سوم 1388؛ در 484ص؛ شابک 9789641740827؛ چاپ چهارم 1389؛ چاپ پنجم 1390؛ موضوع: سرگذشتنامه باراک اوباما - از نویسندگان ایالات متحده آمریکا - سده 20م

عنوان: رویاهایی از پدرم؛ نویسنده: باراک اوباما؛ مترجم منیژه شیخ جوادی (بهزاد)؛ ویراستار ابوالفتح قهرمانی؛ تهران، سیته، 1388؛ در 438ص؛ شابک 9786005253092؛

عنوان: رویاهایی از پدرم؛ نویسنده: باراک اوباما؛ مترجم: منصور حکمی؛ تهران،شرکت انتشارات قلم، 1389؛ در 624ص؛ شابک 9789643162290؛

عنوان: رویاهایی از زمان پدرم: داستانی از نژاد و میراث؛ نویسنده: باراک اوباما؛ ‏‫مترجم: اصغر اندرودی؛ تهران: اوحدی‏‫‏، ‫1388؛ در ‏619ص؛ شابک 9789648234818؛

عنوان: در رویای پدر؛ نویسنده: باراک اوباما؛ مترجم: علی مراد کاکائی؛ تهران، آزادمهر، چاپ دوم 1397؛ در 559ص؛ شابک 9786005564570؛

عنوان: ‏‫رویاهای پدرم؛ نویسنده: باراک‌ حسین اوباما؛ مترجم: موسسه خط ممتد اندیشه؛ تهران، تبارک، 1387؛ در یک جلد؛ شابک 9648226091؛

در این زندگینامه ی شور انگیز و خواندنی، پسر یک پدر سیاهپوست آفریقایی، و یک مادر سفید پوست آمریکایی، در جستجوی مفهومی برای زندگی خویشتن است؛ داستان از نیویورک آغاز میشود، جاییکه «باراک اوباما»، درمییابند، که پدرشان (شخصیتی که بیشتر ایشان را به شکل یک اسطوره، و نه یک انسان میشناسند) در تصادف اتومبیل، کشته شده است؛ این مرگ ناگهانی، الهام بخش یک سفر پرماجرا میشود؛ نخست به شهر کوچکی در کانزاس، نقطه ای که «باراک اوباما» در آنجا، مهاجرت خانواده مادری اش به هاوایی را، دنبال میکنند، و سپس به «کنیا» میروند، جاییکه اقوام آفریقایی خود را، ملاقات میکنند، و با حقیقت تلخ زندگی پدرشان آشنا میشوند، و سرانجام دو میراث جداگانه ی خویشتن را با هم آشتی میدهند

تاریخ بهنگام رسانی 21/03/1399هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی . more

In early 2017, for many people in the U.S. and abroad, Obama nostalgia is real and rampant. I used the moment to look back at Barack Obama before he was president, before he was a US Senator and a state senator for Illinois, and discover the making of the man in his memoir Dreams from My Father. Overall, I&aposd give this 3.5 stars and round up to 4 stars. I very much enjoyed parts of Obama&aposs journey to adulthood, especially his childhood in Hawaii and Indonesia which I found interesting and well-wr In early 2017, for many people in the U.S. and abroad, Obama nostalgia is real and rampant. I used the moment to look back at Barack Obama before he was president, before he was a US Senator and a state senator for Illinois, and discover the making of the man in his memoir Dreams from My Father. Overall, I'd give this 3.5 stars and round up to 4 stars. I very much enjoyed parts of Obama's journey to adulthood, especially his childhood in Hawaii and Indonesia which I found interesting and well-written, and while the later chapters detailing the consuming, difficult work of community organizing in Chicago and then meeting his extended family in Kenya prior to beginning law school also offer great insight, they are a bit less structurally sound, more peppered with rhetoric, less narrative oriented than the previous chapters. But it's a fascinating glimpse at the early life of the 44th president in his own words, and I enjoyed seeing the anecdotal threads that connected to Obama's personality and policies during his presidency. And his meditations on race relations and his own personal struggle with identity were enlightening, and I personally found it intriguing and answered some questions I'd had about Obama's self-categorization as being black, and not biracial.

Above all though, you get a firsthand glimpse of the young "Barry" Obama becoming Barack, and what it meant to be a biracial and a black man coming of age in the 60s, 70s and early 80s. His writing and he are intelligent and compassionate, but sometimes the writing style can turn a bit self-indulgent or smug, a criticism lobbed during Obama's presidency but much more subdued than in Dreams with My Father, showing the progress and maturity of a man more comfortable in his own intelligence and skin. He writes of his rage and his anger, but also his vulnerability and fear, of and for himself, and of and for the world he inhabits, and sometimes neither party knows quite what to do with each other.

I both understood and was puzzled by some of his feelings of loathing and anger towards himself and US society: I too am a biracial American with a black father and a white mother, though female and with two American parents born and raised, and I personally could connect with various aspects of his struggle and the larger struggle of the black community. But I've never had to face a choice or confusion over what race to be or how to identify myself: I was raised to think of myself as both black and white, as biracial. When Obama was first elected and I discovered he identified himself as black, I accepted that as his right, but was mildly disappointed he hadn't seized a moment to show other multiracial children and adults that the world doesn't (or shouldn't) require them to pick a side, so to speak, that we can represent and be part of both/all races equally. But reading his memoir, and seeing just how different it can be to be a biracial child of the 60s to late 70s, versus me, born in the late 80s coming of age in the 90s and 00s, I definitely got a much better, fuller, deeper understanding of how, where and why Obama came to his own self-identification that still allowed for the embrace of his diverse background.

I hadn't heard of Obama or Dreams from My Father when it was first published in 1995 (like most Americans, plus I was nine), and while I was well aware of the book in 2004 when it was re-released just after his famous DNC keynote address, I just never ended up reading it. Reading it now, over two decades after it was first published, I've gained a much better appreciation both for Barack Obama, President, but even more so Barack Obama, person, and even if the version we meet in Dreams with My Father is simply a snapshot in time, the major elements of all the best attributes and actions of Obama are visible. And even if I had some occasional issues with the writing, tone, pacing, I overall found this a worthy read, informative and entertaining and thought provoking. It was a privilege to read through Obama's very personal struggles and difficulties and feel his compassion for others, knowing what path that man would take, and it's a fantastic story: from being estranged from the world, he would go on to lead it. . more

Forget for a moment who the author has become. This is not a book written by a politician or a would-be president. It&aposs a book that was written by someone who subsequently became those things. For that reason, it&aposs a very honest account of an American coming to terms with who he is and where he&aposs from. As a bonus, Obama happens to be an excellent writer. He has a good sense of how to fashion an interesting narrative, so his personal story is very engaging.

As a normal part of becoming an adult, a Forget for a moment who the author has become. This is not a book written by a politician or a would-be president. It's a book that was written by someone who subsequently became those things. For that reason, it's a very honest account of an American coming to terms with who he is and where he's from. As a bonus, Obama happens to be an excellent writer. He has a good sense of how to fashion an interesting narrative, so his personal story is very engaging.

As a normal part of becoming an adult, a boy at some point begins to look critically at, and compare himself to, his father. And if that father was physically or emotionally absent, it may be even more true and a more important rite of passage. Obama's account of his own search for his missing father is compelling and it is one that many men can relate to. And for that reason it is also a book that should be read by women who want to understand men.

Beyond issues of men and their fathers, Obama also relates his struggle for identity as a black man in a white family in the 1970s, as a boy being raised by his single mother and grandparents, as a teenager making decisions about drugs, and a host of other issues.

In short, this is a great 'book-club book' because there are so many broad themes that can be catalysts for discussion.

Whether or not you're a fan of this president's politics, challenge yourself to look beyond that and discover the richness in this important memoir.

“I thought I could start over, you see. But now I know you can never start over. Not really. You think you have control, but you are like a fly in somebody else’s web. Sometimes I think that’s why I like accounting. All day, you are only dealing with numbers. You add them, multiply them, and if you are careful, you will always have a solution. There’s a sequence there. An order. With numbers, you can have control….”

“Winter came and the city [Chicago] turned monochrome -- black trees again “I thought I could start over, you see. But now I know you can never start over. Not really. You think you have control, but you are like a fly in somebody else’s web. Sometimes I think that’s why I like accounting. All day, you are only dealing with numbers. You add them, multiply them, and if you are careful, you will always have a solution. There’s a sequence there. An order. With numbers, you can have control….”

“Winter came and the city [Chicago] turned monochrome -- black trees against gray sky above white earth. Night now fell in midafternoon, especially when the snowstorms rolled in, boundless prairie storms that set the sky close to the ground, the city lights reflected against the clouds” . more

I listened to this audiobook in the waning days of Obama&aposs presidency. Dreams from My Father is about Obama&aposs family, his childhood, and how he got his start in community organizing in Chicago.

Some of my favorite stories were about Barack&aposs grandparents, his memories of his mother and father, and finally, his visit to Kenya to meet his African relatives. It was interesting to read this memoir, first published in 1995, and to recognize all that Obama has accomplished since writing it.

The audio f I listened to this audiobook in the waning days of Obama's presidency. Dreams from My Father is about Obama's family, his childhood, and how he got his start in community organizing in Chicago.

Some of my favorite stories were about Barack's grandparents, his memories of his mother and father, and finally, his visit to Kenya to meet his African relatives. It was interesting to read this memoir, first published in 1995, and to recognize all that Obama has accomplished since writing it.

The audio file included Obama's keynote address at the 2004 Democratic National Convention, which is just as powerful as when I first heard it 12 years ago. It was inspiring to listen to Obama read his story, and I'd heartily recommend it. . more

This is one of those books that I want to buy for everyone I know. Apart from any of the political ideas in the book or whether or not one is excited by his presidency, Obama is a fantastic writer -- this is one of the best memoirs I have ever read. Apart from an occasional slip into melodramatic prose (very occasional, and certainly less than the average memoir), the prose balanced clarity and description, and Obama very consciously keeps from slipping into nostalgia or over-idealizing any time This is one of those books that I want to buy for everyone I know. Apart from any of the political ideas in the book or whether or not one is excited by his presidency, Obama is a fantastic writer -- this is one of the best memoirs I have ever read. Apart from an occasional slip into melodramatic prose (very occasional, and certainly less than the average memoir), the prose balanced clarity and description, and Obama very consciously keeps from slipping into nostalgia or over-idealizing any time in his life or place he visits. After his terms in office (note the optimistic plural!), he could easily have a career as an author. Had he never become president, or even entered politics, this would be a book worth reading, and one of the best modern coming-of-age stories out there.

Slipping from review into personal politics, reading this book was exhilarating. Like much of his base, I've been a fan of Obama's ever since the '04 Convention. I was actually voting for Richardson (yes, I was part of that 2% of the electorate) up until Obama gave his speech on race last March, when I decided not only would he make a good president, but that America NEEDED Obama. Still, I never read any of his writing -- didn't want to be too rabid, and even know I know that, over the next eight years he will disappoint me, make compromises, and have to be part of the political machine.

I was excited enough to travel do get out the vote on election day and to brave D.C. for the inauguration, and yet reading this book made me even MORE excited that this man is our president. Because he gets it: us, America, blacks, whites, working-class people, intellectuals, immigrants. The fact that a man who has had the thoughts he puts in this book, who has struggled with coming of age as a young black man, who has loved his white mother, organized in the projects of Chicago, struggled in school, and travelled to Africa is running our country is amazing. His insights on race, history, identity, and class are some of the most nuanced and astute I've read -- he understands how his white grandfather could be both a well-intentioned progressive and yet involuntarily racist at the same time how young black men can be both victims of and perpetuators of the myths of masculinity and race that ensnare them how most people are actually good but that being good isn't necessarily enough to escape the weight of history and mutual misunderstanding.

Whether you have a huge crush on Obama (like myself!), are more restrained, or even didn't vote for him, you owe it to yourself to read this book, to better understand where the man who is now our President is coming from. . more

In the introduction, Obama writes that looking back on this book after the passage of over a decade, he winces at inelegant phrasing, and wishes that he could excise perhaps fifty of its four hundred and fifty pages. That&aposs the kind of self-critique with which this book abounds—honest and very deliberately even-handed. It&aposs a critique I agree with, by the way—Obama has a tendency to go off on slight rhetorical flights which may sound good when delivered in a speech, but which need to be tempered In the introduction, Obama writes that looking back on this book after the passage of over a decade, he winces at inelegant phrasing, and wishes that he could excise perhaps fifty of its four hundred and fifty pages. That's the kind of self-critique with which this book abounds—honest and very deliberately even-handed. It's a critique I agree with, by the way—Obama has a tendency to go off on slight rhetorical flights which may sound good when delivered in a speech, but which need to be tempered somewhat when confined to the page—but those quibbles aside, I thought this was an astoundingly well-written memoir, especially given the fact that it was written by someone then only in his thirties. So few politicians have the ability to write with such vivid clarity and such honesty.

I found his discussion of the intersections of race, politics, and culture in modern America to be very interesting, particularly since I am from a country which doesn't have a history of absorbing many people of other racial backgrounds, but which is beginning to be forced to face its own latent racism thanks to a growing tide of modern immigration. It was compelling and thought-provoking many times I caught myself thinking "But. " and then wondering why I had that reaction, why my own defensiveness, and unpacking some of that while I read took time.

The opening half of the book, in which Obama describes his childhood and his experiences in college and working in Chicago, interested me the most perhaps, I think, because he was very good at showing the ways in which he was situated within wider (white) American culture, and the difficulties and the confusions and the hurts that this had caused him and the black community. I thought the latter half, set in Africa, wobbled a little because it displayed a self-indulgence that Obama had not previously been prone to, and because for all that Obama examined his relationship to Africa in terms of his own blackness, he seemed curiously unwilling to do so in terms of his own Americanness.

There's one strange thing I noticed: Obama, in what I've seen of him in interviews and on television, has always seemed to be very charming and very personable, with a ready wit. Very little of that came across in this book he didn't seem to laugh at himself very much—intelligent and personable, yes, but some of the spark of charisma was missing. I wonder how much of that is selective editing, how much the influence of the topic of his memoir, and how much because he would slowly grow into the person we see now over the course of the last decade. . more

This is the first of the books written by Barack Obama. He was thirty-three at the time of its publication, a graduate of Harvard Law and practicing in Chicago. Thoughts of a run for the Senate were beginning to coalesce. He was, at this stage, an exacting man. So when he tells us this is a story of race and inheritance, we may be certain it is precisely that.

His is a strong and sometimes stiff accounting of life as the son of an African father and a white American mother - that straddle of our This is the first of the books written by Barack Obama. He was thirty-three at the time of its publication, a graduate of Harvard Law and practicing in Chicago. Thoughts of a run for the Senate were beginning to coalesce. He was, at this stage, an exacting man. So when he tells us this is a story of race and inheritance, we may be certain it is precisely that.

His is a strong and sometimes stiff accounting of life as the son of an African father and a white American mother - that straddle of our nation's racial divide. It is the story of a man's cultural consciousness coming of age. And it is a form of testimony honed, through both its strength and stiffness, to passages possessed of a remarkably sharp and powerful edge.

The following (admittedly long) passage is pulled as a sample of the quality of thought and self-reflection Barack Obama applies to the matters that concern him. It is the middle of the night. There are boys in a car on the street out front, their noise disrupting the sleep of the neighborhood. He has come down to ask them to move on.

The four boys inside say nothing, don't even move. The wind wipes away my drowsiness, and I feel suddenly exposed, standing in a pair of shorts on the sidewalk in the middle of the night. I can't see their faces inside the car it's too dark to know how old they are, whether they're sober or drunk, good boys or bad. One of them could be Kyle. One of them could be Roy. One of them could be Johnnie.

One of them could be me. Standing there, I try to remember the days when I would have been sitting in a car like that, full of inarticulate resentments and desperate to prove my place in the world. The feelings of righteous anger as I shout at Gramps for some forgotten reason. The blood rush of a high school brawl. The swagger that carries me into a classroom drunk or high, knowing that my teachers will smell beer or reefer on my breath, just daring them to say something. I start picturing myself through the eyes of these boys, a figure of random authority, and know the calculations they might now be making, that if one of them can't take me out, the four of them certainly can.

That knotted, howling assertion of self - as I try to pierce the darkness and read the shadowed faces inside the car, I'm thinking that while these boys may be weaker or stronger than I was at their age, the only difference that matters is this: The world in which I spent those difficult times was far more forgiving. These boys have no margin for error if they carry guns, those guns will offer them no protection from that truth. And it is that truth, a truth that they surely sense but can't admit and, in fact, must refuse if they are to wake up tomorrow, that has forced them, or others like them, eventually to shut off access to any empathy they may once have felt. Their unruly maleness will not be contained, as mine finally was, by a sense of sadness at an older man's injured pride. Their anger won't be checked by the intimation of danger that would come upon me whenever I split another boy's lip or raced down a highway with gin clouding my head. As I stand there, I find myself thinking that somewhere down the line both guilt and empathy speak to our own buried sense that an order of some sort is required, not the social order that exists, necessarily, but something more fundamental and more demanding a sense, further, that one has a stake in this order, a wish that, no matter how fluid this order sometimes appears, it will not drain out of the universe.

And this, for me, is important. Because a wall is a symbol. A symbol. And I ask myself if I want to spend all my energy constructing a physical representation of my fear, or instead get to work on its cause. Isn't what I'm really after the development of a more rigorous and principled standard of order? Harder to build than a wall. but then, most things are.

This is a book I recommend not only to those curious about the life of our former president, but to anyone seeking an entry point to a more comprehensive contemplation of race in modern-day America.
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What a thought-provoking book! The book is split into three sections (Origins, Chicago and Kenya). I tried splitting up my reading of it in roughly the same manner since it&aposs easier for me to get through a non-fiction book if I intersperse it with fiction.

I think each section left me with a different series of questions. Origins left me thinking about community: its value, how we choose it, are chosen by it, and what it means to be within and without community. Origins also made me ponder how ch What a thought-provoking book! The book is split into three sections (Origins, Chicago and Kenya). I tried splitting up my reading of it in roughly the same manner since it's easier for me to get through a non-fiction book if I intersperse it with fiction.

I think each section left me with a different series of questions. Origins left me thinking about community: its value, how we choose it, are chosen by it, and what it means to be within and without community. Origins also made me ponder how challenging adolescence is for anyone and how those challenges are compounded for someone who doesn't quite fit in to any one category.

Chicago made me think about what I see as the big problems of our society today: how to empower people not only practically, but help them believe in possibilities. Obama brings an interesting perspective to his work on the south side of Chicago because he is both within and apart from the community he is serving. I was encouraged by his persistence in getting to know people who needed help and felt a desire to be more persistent in building relationships with those in my community who need help.

Kenya made me think about family. I ended the book unsure whether family is blessing, burden or both. Obama's relationship to his family differs vastly from mine. Yet I found myself thinking about family and what family's role should be in my life. Am I too quick to disengage from extended family because of the day to day challenges of raising three young children? What are my children losing if I don't make an effort to retain ties to family near and far, old and young? What am I losing? Is it about loss and gain or responsibility?

It took me a while to read this book for several reasons: it's fairly long, it's non-fiction and it made me stop and think. It was well worth my time to read Barack Obama's story and think about my own story - what it is now and what I'll choose to make it. . more

Okay, so full transparency? As a kid, I hated reading biographies. Like, legit, loathed them! Thankfully, life has changed that, and lately, I find myself gravitating towards them more than ever.

As an author, I’ve learned that sometimes the backstory is JUST AS if not (sometimes) MORE important than what’s happening presently. And as someone who’s always looked up to Barack Obama and read most of his other work, there was no way I would let this golden nugget pass me by, especially after seeing Okay, so full transparency? As a kid, I hated reading biographies. Like, legit, loathed them! Thankfully, life has changed that, and lately, I find myself gravitating towards them more than ever.

As an author, I’ve learned that sometimes the backstory is JUST AS if not (sometimes) MORE important than what’s happening presently. And as someone who’s always looked up to Barack Obama and read most of his other work, there was no way I would let this golden nugget pass me by, especially after seeing it pop up on some many friend’s lists!

First off, let me say that this is such an fascinating peek into the world of Barack! It’s filled with dozens of interesting reflections on his family and American culture at it relates to poverty, community, and race.

While most of us are aware he grew up in Hawaii with his mother, many are unaware of just how strained the relationship he had with his father was, which in turn had a negative effect on Obama’s ability to explore his African heritage. Thankfully, by the end of the end, the story takes a happy turn in the form of Obama visiting Kenya and finally meeting the family he never knew. While some say the chapters devoted to detailing this visit were long and boring, personally I found them to be some of the most interesting! It was a very “Antwon Fisher” moment, and if I can be transparent, the reunion legit brought me to tears. (Honest to blog!)

I also appreciated the chance to learn more about his life on the South Side of Chicago as a Community Organizer. As someone who grew up in The Windy City, I’ve always known Obama was well liked, but I had no idea how much of an impact his work had made! Despite the difficulties he faced by other politicians and citizens, he worked his butt of and managed to leave a loving mark on the local communities he helped service and support. You let him tell it, they left a loving impression on him, too. : ) To say I was inspired and encouraged would be putting it lightly. This was a beautiful example of human beings being human beings during a time and in a place where many others were only seemingly thinking about themselves!

In the end, I think this is a fantastic read – well written and not drawn out or boring. Check it out!

Have you ever read a book that just made you flat out mad? Well the book “ Dreams of my Father ” by Barack Obama is one those books. This book lacks common sense that ever book should have. It pays so much attention to characters that do not deserve the time of day. Barack makes his life sound unbearable when in reality his life is really easy.

First, I feel that Obama is making too much fuss over whether he is white or black. As an interracial child that I am, I feel that all you should know wha Have you ever read a book that just made you flat out mad? Well the book “ Dreams of my Father ” by Barack Obama is one those books. This book lacks common sense that ever book should have. It pays so much attention to characters that do not deserve the time of day. Barack makes his life sound unbearable when in reality his life is really easy.

First, I feel that Obama is making too much fuss over whether he is white or black. As an interracial child that I am, I feel that all you should know what you are by looking at who sits at your dinner table.Instead of doing this Obama went on a trip around the world to find out who his was, which made everything complicated.He always made it is a life project when it was so easy to figure out.

Second, Barack gave his father way to much credit in the book. His father left him to go to Africa while his mother raise him, but he made it seem that his father was the one that did all the hard work.He only saw his father maybe twice in the whole book, then had the nerve to act like his father raised him.He never once in the book recognize that his father left and that was that, instead he went to Africa on some life changing journey.

Finally, was that he made his life sound so hard, when in reality it was not the hard nock life the he made it out to be. Barack went to a private school to get the best education when other kids went to public. Barack got to go to college to become what he wanted to become, when other students never got that chance.He had a loving family the worship him more than anything else in the world.

All together this book was just a big mess. In the end it was a waste of my time reading because of three things. By Obama taking too much time on thing that weren’t important made this book one of the worst books I read. Please take caution before reading this book, so you don’t waste your time reading it.
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I started reading this a day after Obama&aposs inauguration. Even though I&aposm not American, it seemed important to do so, and also I was told that the quality of the writing is at least as impressive and the story.

It was published in 1995, shortly after Obama graduated from Harvard Law School and covers his life, or rather his search for identity up till then, in three main sections: childhood in Hawaii, Indonesia and back in Hawaii working in Chicago and visiting Kenya to visit his father&aposs family. I started reading this a day after Obama's inauguration. Even though I'm not American, it seemed important to do so, and also I was told that the quality of the writing is at least as impressive and the story.

It was published in 1995, shortly after Obama graduated from Harvard Law School and covers his life, or rather his search for identity up till then, in three main sections: childhood in Hawaii, Indonesia and back in Hawaii working in Chicago and visiting Kenya to visit his father's family. He accepts a black identity before his teens, but never really feels he fits anywhere - until Kenya. It's intensely personal, yet very private as well: many insights into thoughts about his place in his families, in the world, his race etc, yet almost nothing about what he studied at university, girlfriends, what he did in his spare time, why his mother's relationships broke down, what the half sister he grew up with was like, becoming a Christian etc.

It's generally very well written and in the Chicago sections in particular, I really felt I could "hear" the voices of those he quoted in a very literal and accented way. That said, some of the lengthy telling of his father's life, in the words of Kenyan relatives were much flatter.

My only gripes are the lack of an index or a family tree of his complicated Kenyan family (and a few photos might have been nice).

Overall, a very enjoyable and positive experience. He invariably sees the best in people (though he's not blind to their weaknesses) and there are strong echoes of what he said in the presidential election, which indicates (to me) a reassuring degree of insight, consistency and integrity.

This was the first book that I ever put in my To-Read folder when I joined Goodreads and now I have finally read it.

This was a great book. I finished it in one day, which is extremely rare for me.

"Obama opens his story in New York, where he hears that his father—a figure he knows more as a myth than as a man—has died in a car accident. The news triggers a chain of memories as Barack retraces his family’s unusual history: the migration of his mother’s family from small-town Kansas to the Hawaiian This was the first book that I ever put in my To-Read folder when I joined Goodreads and now I have finally read it.

This was a great book. I finished it in one day, which is extremely rare for me.

"Obama opens his story in New York, where he hears that his father—a figure he knows more as a myth than as a man—has died in a car accident. The news triggers a chain of memories as Barack retraces his family’s unusual history: the migration of his mother’s family from small-town Kansas to the Hawaiian islands the love that develops between his mother and a promising young Kenyan student, a love nurtured by youthful innocence and the integrationist spirit of the early sixties his father’s departure from Hawaii when Barack was two, as the realities of race and power reassert themselves and Barack’s own awakening to the fears and doubts that exist not just between the larger black and white worlds but within himself.
Propelled by a desire to understand both the forces that shaped him and his father’s legacy, Barack moves to Chicago to work as a community organizer. There, against the backdrop of tumultuous political and racial conflict, he works to turn back the mounting despair of the inner city. His story becomes one with those of the people he works with as he learns about the value of community, the necessity of healing old wounds, and the possibility of faith in the midst of adversity.
Barack’s journey comes full circle in Kenya, where he finally meets the African side of his family and confronts the bitter truth of his father’s life. Traveling through a country racked by brutal poverty and tribal conflict, but whose people are sustained by a spirit of endurance and hope, Barack discovers that he is inescapably bound to brothers and sisters living an ocean away—and that by embracing their common struggles he can finally reconcile his divided inheritance." . more

Yet another library sale shelf find, this was originally published in 1995, before Barack Obama became the man he was meant to be.

This is the story of how he became that man: the forces that shaped him over the years, the internal struggles to understand himself and his family and the world around him.

The Chicago chapters did drag a bit for me, but overall the book was wonderful. Next time I go to the library, I want to see which other titles of his are available. I am sure they will be worth re Yet another library sale shelf find, this was originally published in 1995, before Barack Obama became the man he was meant to be.

This is the story of how he became that man: the forces that shaped him over the years, the internal struggles to understand himself and his family and the world around him.

The Chicago chapters did drag a bit for me, but overall the book was wonderful. Next time I go to the library, I want to see which other titles of his are available. I am sure they will be worth reading.

Loved it!! Just a huge Obama fan. He can read the phonebook and would have me at A. A more substantial rtf.

Listened to the audiobook. Obama was the narrator and in fact won a Grammy for this production. While I won&apost comment on the merits of that award, I do think the book was well narrated. Loved it!! Just a huge Obama fan. He can read the phonebook and would have me at A. A more substantial rtf.

Listened to the audiobook. Obama was the narrator and in fact won a Grammy for this production. While I won't comment on the merits of that award, I do think the book was well narrated. . more

This is quite a remarkable book considering that this individual is now President of the U.S. It was written when he was far removed from the Presidential radar.

It is well written and the narrative is very vivid. The book is divided into three sections with very little inter-connectedness between them.

The first is about his roots and growing up with his mother and grand-parents – in far flung regions of the world – Hawaii and Indonesia. The second is focused on Chicago and the community work he This is quite a remarkable book considering that this individual is now President of the U.S. It was written when he was far removed from the Presidential radar.

It is well written and the narrative is very vivid. The book is divided into three sections with very little inter-connectedness between them.

The first is about his roots and growing up with his mother and grand-parents – in far flung regions of the world – Hawaii and Indonesia. The second is focused on Chicago and the community work he attempts to do. The last is about his journey to Kenya to be with his father’s side of the family.

I found the first section to be the most revealing and personal – it sets the tone for the overall book. There are confessions of his awkwardness, of anger and rebelliousness, of not fitting into society. These are common complaints of most young people but Mr. Obama is quite eloquent about them. We sense an intelligent person with a keen sense of worldly observation – an individual who can astutely look at people from multiple viewpoints.

I did become somewhat confused during the Africa portion it would have been good to have a kinship chart to keep track of all these people – the half-brothers, many aunts and uncles and grandparents.

One also gets the feeling that Mr. Obama is obsessed with finding the meaning of his long-lost father who was absent throughout his developing years (his father spent two weeks with him when he was 10 years old). It is like he is looking for a lost ghost – trying to find a missing link – a replenishment.

This is a rare instance in modern times where a President has written a book (an autobiography at that) years prior to becoming a President. The only comparison I can think of (coming from Canada) is Pierre Eliot Trudeau who wrote several journalistic articles before becoming Prime Minister.

Mr. Obama’s book is distinctive and enjoyable.
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Barack Obama&aposs life not only makes for a great story, it shows a lot about the character of the man telling it--both in the way he tells it, but also in the events that happened and the way he handled them. I am impressed by his level of honesty about himself--he does not paint himself to be pristine, but makes himself very human. It is in this exposure of his vulnerabilities, his fears, his insecurities that he becomes like us--simply human. On that level, we can connect to the story of his lif Barack Obama's life not only makes for a great story, it shows a lot about the character of the man telling it--both in the way he tells it, but also in the events that happened and the way he handled them. I am impressed by his level of honesty about himself--he does not paint himself to be pristine, but makes himself very human. It is in this exposure of his vulnerabilities, his fears, his insecurities that he becomes like us--simply human. On that level, we can connect to the story of his life and let it enrich our own experience.

On a personal note, one of the interesting bits for me was the chapter about his community organizing efforts in Chicago because he was working with an affiliate of the Gamaliel Foundation which ran the leadership program I went to last summer, so the language and methods he was using was all very familiar to me.

I said months ago that if Barack Obama tossed his hat in the ring for the 2008 Presidential race that I would change my registration to Democrat for the first time in my voting life so that I could vote for him in the primary. After reading this book, I am only more convicted in that decision. Senator Obama is the kind of man I want running my country. He is a man of integrity, who cares about the working poor of our nation. He has a global vision--he inherited that in part by the simple accident of his life, but he could have turned his back on the complicated messiness of his existence and tried to erase it all. He is a very smart man, and he could have just taken advantage of his Punahou education to go off to college and head into the corporate world forever. He could have made a good living, taken care of his own. Instead, he chose to explore and find a place in which he could call his soul his own, in which he could be authentically himself.

Obama does not have all the answers to the world's ills, but I am confident that he will look at the hard questions facing this nation and our global community with compassion, intelligence, and ethical values. I don't want a "Decider"--at least not at the cost of careful deliberation that keeps peace, liberty, and justice for all as the marks of success.

It is time for this nation to again be called to return to itself. To seek the beloved community, to become a beacon on the hill--calling the world to hear the call of our founding fathers for democracy, justice, and equality. It is time again for us to suffer the audacity of hope. It is time again for us to dream. . more

Dreams From My Father by Barack Obama

It was obvious for me to read this memoir. I saw the book in the local library almost three years ago and right then I had decided that I will read it, but being busy in other works, couldn’t get the time. This year was also slipping, so at last I borrowed and knowing not much about it I posted a picture in the group and just asked , “How’s it?”. And this, “How’s it” stirred a heated political argument. Oh My God! It was so much that the admin had Dreams From My Father by Barack Obama

It was obvious for me to read this memoir. I saw the book in the local library almost three years ago and right then I had decided that I will read it, but being busy in other works, couldn’t get the time. This year was also slipping, so at last I borrowed and knowing not much about it I posted a picture in the group and just asked , “How’s it?”. And this, “How’s it” stirred a heated political argument. Oh My God! It was so much that the admin had to turn the comments off. In fact, the book is apolitical to some extents. Apolitical in the sense that Obama hasn’t expressed any political desire of himself, but he talked much about the then ongoing situation of Racism in USA, its history, significance and impact. It was published in 1995. It explores vividly the times between his earlier years and his entry in the Law school in 1988.

The book is divided in three parts- Origin, Chicago and Kenya.

In 1959, Obama’s father (Obama Sr.) arrived at the University of Hawaii as the institution’s first African student from Kenya. He studied Econometrics there and in a Russian language course, he met a shy American girl Ann Dunham. They fell in love, happily married. Obama was born in 1961. His father won another scholarship to pursue his Ph.D. in Harvard- but not the money to take his family there. A separation thus occurred. Obama Sr. returned to Africa to fulfill his promise to the continent and the new born country.

Ann Dunham met another man in the same University. His name was Lolo Soetoro, an Indonesian. He was a short handsome gentleman. When Obama was six, Lolo returned to Indonesia and started working as a Geologist. Obama also moved to Indonesia with his mother and learned a great deal about its history and behavior. With Lolo he learned to eat plenty of rice in dinner, dog meat, snake meat, roasted grasshopper etc. Besides eating habits, he learnt a bit of boxing and some pragmatism from his stepfather like, “One must be strong. If you can’t be strong, be clever and make peace with someone who is strong. But always better to be strong yourself.” It shows Obama loved his company, but things got changed as his mother smelt something fishy. Ann was working in American embassy. She was somewhat idealistic in her motherhood and had great impact on Barack’s conscience in his childhood. Lolo got highly involved with Indonesian elite and multinational corporations. It made Ann very upset. She was particularly upset for Barack’s studies. That’s why she sent Barack Hawaii back to his grandparents and later herself joined him with his half-sister Maya. Barack was enrolled here in the elite Punahou school that he didn’t like seldom. Lolo was left in Indonesia.

Obama Sr. paid a visit to Hawaii when Barack was ten years old. Though Barack was acquainted with him through his mother and grandparents’ stories, but it was the first time he was consciously watching and interacting. Even Barack got the chance to dance with him but whenever Obama Sr. tried to exercise his authority as his father, the situation became tense. It was logical, I think. Obama Sr. returned to Kenya. It was the last time when Barack saw his father alive. Later he came to know from his step-sister Auma that this was his father’s last attempt to reconcile with his mother Ann, that wasn’t successful.

Afterwards Ann joined college to study Anthropology and when she went to Indonesia for her fieldwork, Obama stayed with his grandparents. It was the time when Obama got a loose from her mother’s influence and tries to find his own racial identity in the outer world. As the case was, Obama himself was of a mixed breed, and the skin he had resembled his father more than his mother. He couldn’t escape from his African lineage. He becomes aware of the fact how much important role Race and Racism play in the lives of African Americans. He tried drugs, made friends in his community and played basketball also in his high-school team.

When Obama attended the Occidental College outside of Los Angles, he got the chance to live with enlightened African American friends of his own age. In this period, he read a lot of literature about American History and Polity. Still, he wasn’t satisfied or sure about his racial identity. The breakthrough in his life came when he was transferred to Columbia University during his sophomore year and there he decided that he will dedicate his life in the service of African American people. Though this was his resolution but he took a job in corporate sector and enjoyed it for a year approx. It was when he turned 21 and got the news from his step sister Auma that his father had died in a car accident in Kenya, he realized that it was the appropriate time to activate his resolution. Erstwhile, in his boyhood, his father’s absence affected him negatively as he was like a myth for him, but at this mature age, he felt somewhat of loss and his father became for him a source of motivation.


Barrack Obama

Would you have ever imagined that there would be an African-American president, leading the United States? On August 4th, 1961 Barack Obama was brought into the world. Michelle Obama is Barack’s wife Barack has 2 daughters with Michelle Sasha and Malia. One of his most famous quotes is, “Change doesn't come from Washington. Change comes to Washington.” His collegiate days were diverse. Although, he has committed a few mistakes in his presidency Barack Obama has accomplished plenty remarkable feats in his career. He is also a best-selling author for writing The Audacity of Hope. As a young adult, his efforts to study hard paid off and later became the President of the United States.

Barrack Obama has had a distinct college experience. Barack attended two different colleges before graduating with a magna cum laude in Harvard. At Occidental College, he studied political science for 2 years afterward, transferring to Columbia University to complete his studies and get his degree on political science. 5 years later, Obama went back to his studies and chose to attend Harvard Law School where he became the first African-American in the Harvard Law Review to be an editor. Barack later wrote two books after graduating from Harvard.

Barack Obama has written two books during his life. He wrote his first book, Dreams From My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance back in 1995. Later on in 2006, Obama wrote The Audacity of Hope which became an instant best-seller after appearing on The Oprah Winfrey Show. In conclusion, the two books he wrote were one of the few accomplishments Barack attained.

The accomplishments that Barack has achieved are abundant. Barack graduated from Harvard with a magna cum laude honor. Winning the presidential election in 2008, he became the first African-American President of the United States. In 2009, Barack won the Nobel Peace Prize. After receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, Obama stated, “I receive this honor.


It's been speculated that racism drove Obama Sr. to leave America, leading to him working as a Senior Economist for the Kenyan government.

In a Politico piece that draws from the immigration file on Barack Obama Sr. obtained by The Arizona Independent, there is evidence of his encounters with American immigration officials who were part of the INS. The writer posits that racism may have contributed to him leaving the country.

Immigration officials were keeping close watch on Obama Sr. following his marriage to Dunham, and they even communicated with Harvard, where he was then studying, about pressing him on "his marital problems." The Politico piece said that then, "Harvard gets back to the INS and reports that while the student has passed all his exams, the university is 'going to try to cook something up to ease him out.'"

Eventually, school officials told Obama that they ran out of money to cover his scholarship, which would lead to the end of his student visa.

Elsewhere in the file, a woman who was likely the mother of his Obama Sr.'s third wife, Ruth Nidesand, called in and complained about her daughter agreeing to marry him.

Eventually, he received his Doctorate in Economics, and, according to The Barack H. Obama Foundation's website, worked "with the Kenya Government as a Senior Economist in the Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning." He also held jobs with Shell and the Central Bank of Kenya, per Jacobs.


DREAMS FROM MY FATHER A Story of Race and Inheritance (DJ is Protected by a Clear, Acid-Free Mylar Cover. )

Obama, Barack

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Barack Obama – Dreams from My Father Audiobook

Barack Obama – Dreams from My Father Audio Book Free https://ipaudio6.com/wp-content/uploads/BOOKAUDIO/Dreams%20from%20My%20Father/01.mp3 https://ipaudio6.com/wp-content/uploads/BOOKAUDIO/Dreams%20from%20My%20Father/02.mp3 https://ipaudio6.com/wp-content/uploads/BOOKAUDIO/Dreams%20from%20My%20Father/03.mp3 https://ipaudio6.com/wp-content/uploads/BOOKAUDIO/Dreams%20from%20My%20Father/04.mp3 https://ipaudio6.com/wp-content/uploads/BOOKAUDIO/Dreams%20from%20My%20Father/05.mp3 https://ipaudio6.com/wp-content/uploads/BOOKAUDIO/Dreams%20from%20My%20Father/06.mp3 text

It’s clear exactly how from Obama’s life just how he ended up being such a significant, stylish, intellectual, self-displined, well balanced and also compassionate male. I am impressed at just how interesting his life has actually been and by that I suggest before his presidency. I am a big fan of Obama and his family based on what he attained as our 44th head of state but after reviewing the book I recognize he earned all his emotional nature. Well written as well as enjoyably understandable, he is honest about his success and also failings. His humanness however yet his amazing willpower make him an interesting main personality. I specifically suched as reading about his family members in Africa and the time he spent with them. I have no doubt how developmental it was for him to be a biracial, half African, half midwestern American living his childhood largely with his grandparents in Oahu having also spent a few of his young years in Indonesia with his mother and also stepfather. This is a reward to check out. It’s a wonder I have not read this book before. Dreams from My Father Audiobook Free. Considering that I initially found out about it, I knew it would ultimately drift my method and also I am thankful it has. Barack’s story, thus many others, is among identification, affirmation, as well as of his extensive sense of existing. With eloquence and also a relatively poetic option of words, we ride with him on a bumpy train of interest, loss, self exploration, individual growth, persistence and delight. We check out each home and also at each circumstances he brings it to life covering it in context and history as well as forcing visitors to consider its impact on those involved.

As an African American man that has actually gotten some momentum in being authentically me, I value how much of him is likewise a combinations of those closest to him. Thanks Barack for taking a seat and also making the effort to share your journey with me, it was a worthwhile venture to explore this phase in your life. Nonetheless, as it should be, I remain desiring more.The ideal variation of this is the audio variation which Obama reviews himself, even with various accents. This is a touching book which defines his multi-cultural, biracial childhood and hence explains his constant desire to assist individuals understand each other, his wish to bridge splits. I had a book duplicate yet I acquired both the hardback version of the book, for pleasure in the years ahead, as well as the sound, which is fascinating.
I wanted to read this over the length of his presidency, but it never happened. It was an excellent read. Truly helped me comprehend inner city life as well as the struggles of the black neighborhood. I appreciate his sincerity and also how tough he combated to make individuals’s lives much easier. Makes sense why he was such a terrific president. I was especially relocated with how he discussed the difficulties of being both white as well as black. Such a wonderful narrative. Fantastic.Normalcy … something he appeared to preserve considering that birth. Yes, he was birthed in Hawaii, U.S.A.! I question myself if I had had all the opportunities and roads that he traveled on, I do not assume I would certainly have had normalcy yet, he did. So I obtained a lot out of this remarkable publication! Highs and lows, however that is what a lot of all lives are about.

His dad was very crucial to his area in Kenya due to leaving and also getting a college, along with having youngsters. Though he was not an “I’m right here for supper every night” dad, President Obama does not excuse him for this. He composed this book with truth and also his very own desire for life. I commend him for creating his personal sensations, in addition to the life he led. Most definitely a 5 star publication!
Head of state Obama? Where are you! We require you!Dreams From My Daddy caught me totally unsuspecting. Like many others, I first came to be familiarized with Barack Obama (well, not directly) during his run for Senate. Throughout his historic governmental project, as well as 8 years as president, I seemed like I got a good point of view of the man himself. Nonetheless, this publication reveals a completely various side of Obama. Written after he ended up at Harvard (and entirely concerning his pre-Harvard days), he takes a tough, truthful look at identity in America. I didn’t expect several of the raw temper and also irritation nor did I prepare for the susceptability and sincerity that jumped off the page either. Barack Obama – Dreams from My Father Audio Book Online. Regardless of your background, politics, or heritage, this is an exceptional read.


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